New website launched for APALA 35th Anniversary & Symposium

It’s time to start getting excited!

In anticipation of next year’s upcoming APALA 35th Anniversary & Symposium, we’ve launched a new microsite:

apala35th.apalaweb.org

There you’ll find all the latest news and information about our 35th Anniversary & Symposium in one handy place. Check it out now and bookmark it for future reference ease.

 


And in case you missed it, the deadline for submissions has been extended to October 31.

We know you’re awesome, so how about sharing what you know or have done with the rest the rest of us? Don’t wait, submit today!

 

 

 

APALA 35th Anniversary and Symposium Call for Proposals


UPDATE: Visit the Call for Proposal page on the new APALA 35th Anniversary & Symposium website!


 

Asian / Pacific American Librarians Association
35
th Anniversary & Symposium
San Francisco • June 25, 2015
Building Bridges: Connecting Communities Through Librarianship & Advocacy
Embracing the Past
Engaging the Present
Empowering the Future

The Asian / Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA) turns 35 in 2015! To commemorate this milestone, APALA is holding a one-day symposium on Thursday, June 25 at McLaren Hall on the University of San Francisco campus. Additional programs and cultural events will be organized during the American Library Association Annual Conference.

Founded in 1980 by librarians of diverse Asian and Pacific ancestries, APALA has long been committed to supporting and providing greater visibility for Asian / Pacific American (APA) professionals in the areas of libraries, archives, and museums (LAMs) and advancing services to APA communities. The 35th Anniversary & Symposium is an opportune time to reflect upon and continue to execute its mission by providing information and/or training on: library programs and resources for APA communities; becoming successful library leaders and advocates; and creating linkages with other library associations and APA organizations.

APALA has always aimed to serve as a bridge between LAM professionals and APA communities; LAM professionals of diverse backgrounds; and libraries and APA communities. The symposium continues this theme, bringing in the idea of building bridges in all its connotations — physical, temporal, historical, virtual, individual, organizational, local, and global.

Building Bridges: Connecting Communities Through Librarianship & Advocacy

  • Embracing the Past — Build on APALA’s vision and learn about proven tools and practices for serving APA communities
  • Engaging the Present Find out how to make a difference here and now for our organizations and beyond through leadership and community building
  • Empowering the Future Pave the way to success through lessons and tips on advocacy and professional development

The event is intended to foster discussion address questions such as:

  •  How have libraries and cultural institutions served APA communities? How can APALA create and ensure more programs and tools for APA communities, both physical and virtual, local and global?
  • What kinds of bridges have APALA, and libraries in general, built with APA communities? How can APALA and APA information professionals continue to make alliances and build communities?
  • How have APALA and library leaders advocated for information services to APA communities? What lessons and advice do they have to share?
  • What are the challenges facing APA librarians and communities? What are the new information and technology trends? How can information professionals improve their knowledge and skills for the benefit of APA communities?
  • How can APALA maintain its active role in creating a culturally diverse and inclusive society? How can libraries ensure that APA communities have the information they need to participate fully in society?

With its iconic bridges, San Francisco provides an ideal backdrop for these discussions. The fact that it is also the site of several key landmarks and significant historical events for APAs, such as Angel Island, the I-Hotel, the first Ethnic Studies Department, makes it an even more appropriate place to connect past with the present and future.


 

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

APALA invites you to submit a proposal that addresses the symposium’s theme of building bridges that highlight the vital links between libraries and communities; librarians and library users; ideas and successful outcomes. The ideal presentation would fall under one of these tracks and focus on diverse communities, particularly Asian / Pacific Americans.

Program Tracks

a. Community Building and Outreach

  • Designing effective outreach programs that engage and reflect local community needs
  • Developing best practices and models with respect to issues affecting APA and pan- ethnic communities
  • Building successful collaborations on programming for all ages with different communities and library organizations

b. Cultural Heritage and Educational Materials

  • Developing resources and building library collections related to APAs
  • Creating and preserving APA archival materials (e.g., oral history, community papers, musical recordings, films, etc.) and developing institutional and digital repositories
  • Creating materials that provide APA visibility and representation in a range of formats, such as films, websites, exhibitions, digital storytelling, music, and print literature
  • Developing programs through collaborations with government, non-profit organizations, and local community groups that preserve, maintain, and promote APA cultures and histories

c. Leadership and Advocacy

  • Training and mentoring individuals to acquire essential skills and understanding in working with a diverse staff and clientele
  • Developing essential skills to be effective advocates and change agents.
  • Developing ways to encourage engagement and participation toward making a positive change in the workplace and society
  • Exploring different leadership models that address issues such as, empowerment, micro- aggression, changing organizational culture, consensus building, and mentoring

d. Interpersonal and Career Growth

  • Addressing issues related to workplace dynamics and structure (e.g., cultural competence, conflict resolution and mediation, mentoring, re-organization, staff and professional issues, institutional change)
  • Acquiring or providing training for skills for career change or growth (e.g., technology, public relations, social media, fundraising, grant writing, assessment, management, and planning)
  • Creating a culture that encourages learning and growth as well as trust and respect

PROGRAM FORMATS

Workshop Session (75 minutes)

A group session with facilitator(s) who provide an interactive workshop on a project or topic. The session could be on music, research, video/film making, music, archiving, oral history, outreach programming, advocacy training, or related topics.

Roundtable Session (75 minutes)

A facilitated a discussion amongst presenters and audience participants on a particular topic or broader issue. Submissions should include multiple viewpoints and diverse voices. The majority of the allotted time should be devoted to discussion involving audience members.

Paper/Panel Presentation (75 minutes)

Presentations may cover a specialized topic from different perspectives or a general topic in- depth. Presenters should provide sufficient time for audience discussion. The proposal should specify a moderator who will organize the panel and regulate time. Individual paper submissions could be added in a panel program.

Poster Session (60 minutes)

A creative visual representation of a topic that provides an informal way to convey research, projects, services or ideas of interest to attendees. Presenters will be expected to set-up and host their poster during the allotted time.

RULES FOR SUBMISSION

Please include the following information in your proposal:

Primary Contact: Name, title, institutional affiliation, e-mail address, phone number Participants: name, title, affiliation, email address, and phone number
Proposal information:

  • Program Title
  • Descriptive Abstract for the program booklet (80 word maximum)
  • Program Abstract to include up to three learning outcomes (300 word maximum)

Program Track (select one of the following):

  • Community Building and Outreach
  • Cultural Heritage and Educational Materials
  • Leadership and Advocacy
  • Interpersonal and Career Growth

Program Format (select one of the following):

  • Workshop Session
  • Roundtable Session
  • Paper/Panel Presentation
  • Poster Session

Audio-visual needs:
Data projector and screen will be provided.

Deadline

All proposals must be received by midnight PST on October 31, 2014 as a Word document to apala35proposals@gmail.com. Notifications of proposal selection will be made beginning November 15, 2014.

Questions

Questions may be sent to the APALA 35 Program Committee at apala35proposals@gmail.com.

Non-Commercial Policy

APALA programs are non-commercial educational learning experiences. Under no circumstances should a workshop, session or poster presentation be used for direct promotion of a speaker’s product, service, or other self-interest.

Additional Requirements

All selected program presenters must be registered for the APALA 35th Anniversary & Symposium in order to present.

Presenters are responsible for paying the conference registration fee, travel, and lodging.

Presenters may be invited to use a format other than the one(s) selected or might be invited to co- present with others who have proposed similar topics.

The 2014 Minnesota Institute for Early Career Librarians: A Cohort of Support

by Tarida Anantachai, Simon Lee and Cynthia Mari Orozco

 

Picture image of 21 unidentified participants of the Minnesota Institute for Early Career Librarians 2014 (MIECL)

Bonding through Institute selfies. (Photo credit: DeEtta Jones)

The Minnesota Institute for Early Career Librarians (MIECL) is an intensive, one-week professional development program intended for librarians from underrepresented groups in the first three years of their professional careers. Several APALA members attended the 2014 Institute last July and offered to share some of their takeaways in a series of web articles. In this first of three installments, Tarida Anantachai (Syracuse University), Simon Lee (UCLA), and Cynthia Mari Orozco (CSU Long Beach) reflect on MIECL’s cohort environment and discussions on supportive relationships.

One of MIECL’s learning objectives is to “[develop] a community of peers with whom participants share common experiences and on whom they can rely over time and distance for support and encouragement.” What do you think is the greatest value of the MIECL community?

Tarida Anantachai (TA): Actually, the community was the greatest value of MIECL itself. I am incredibly honored to have connected with such an amazing group of diverse librarians, which has also led to some exciting subsequent collaborations (like this article!). Establishing this community for openly sharing our thoughts—especially important for those who may have felt isolated or cautious in their new professional environments—and knowing that we and previous MIECL graduates are out there supporting other early career, diverse librarians has been both comforting and empowering.  I know that we will be a constant presence for each other throughout our careers, and could not be more grateful for it.

 As an early career librarian of color, it can be difficult finding others who share your perspective and experiences.

Simon Lee (SL): The greatest value of the Institute is connecting with a pool of diverse librarians with whom I can identify with. We are shaping the foundation of our early professional careers and have aspirations to lead and excel. The relationship I built with my cohort will stay with me throughout my professional career. This article mini-series is evidence that the connection does not end at the conclusion of the Institute. I reconnected with numerous members of my cohort through the Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA), we are well connected via social media, and soon I’ll be working with one employed by our library. Only time will tell what other merits will come from being a part of the MIECL.

Cynthia Mari Orozco (CMO): As an early career librarian of color, it can be difficult finding others who share your perspective and experiences. The Institute brought together a strong, passionate cohort of librarians with whom I was able to openly share my thoughts, discuss frustrations and ambiguity, and celebrate milestones and triumphs. Through the Institute, I gained an incredible support system that I have been able to turn to and continue that open dialogue. I have already been collaborating with some of my cohort members on future projects, including proposals for conference presentations and an LIS Microaggressions zine series.

What were the various types of support systems that were discussed at the Institute? How have you applied the lessons you’ve learned about them since then?

TA: Mentoring, unlike other support systems such as helping or coaching relationships, is more focused on broader issues related to the overall growth and development of the mentee. While guidance and feedback is also involved, it is more in terms of providing inspiration and creating a safe space that encourages self-exploration and discovery. Positive mentoring relationships are ongoing conversations of mutual trust that ultimately bolster the mentee’s own aspirations and interests.

Learning about supportive relationships at MIECL has helped me to better appreciate the distinct roles that our varied support systems play in our lives, and which ones may be more appropriate to seek out or apply in particular situations. For instance, I now approach my mentoring relationships as opportunities to reflectively explore ideas on a more holistic level, rather than to simply gather advice or assistance with a given task as in a coaching conversation. Amongst my colleagues and even my friends I have already recognized instances when a particular support behavior (e.g. offering feedback vs. listening vs. empowering someone to action) is better suited for the given need, and feel it has helped me to better address our relationship expectations, goals, and many ways we can support each other.

SL: Coaching/Feedback (CF): The goal of CF is to draw out the best one could be in their position. This challenging support system takes time to master.  CF addresses problematic behaviors in a timely, specific, and focused manner. If, hypothetically, a sudden and unexpected outburst arises, find a reasonable time to discuss the issue, be specific about the outburst, and focus on that. The impact of that outburst may have led to subsequent problems which affects an entire team. Feedback requires that you truly desire to help a person improve and that one be thoughtful, diplomatic, and mindful. Most importantly, it requires that the subject is a willing and careful listener so it could be acted upon. Having an agreed action plan to gauge improvement is a possibility for effective coaching and feedback.

The Institute taught me the distinctions between these three supportive systems. My previous mentorships were short-lived because they were informal and unstructured. I have since continued regular, structured monthly meetings with my mentor which allow me to go back to readings, conversations, and focus on learning goals. The helping relationship enabled me to exercise better listening, which empower others to verbalize solutions they can claim as their own. CF should occur over the course of the year as opposed to the performance evaluation period. Time is needed for noticeable improvements.

Positive mentoring relationships are ongoing conversations of mutual trust that ultimately bolster the mentee’s own aspirations and interests.

CMO: Lastly, there’s the helping relationship, in which a person has a specific problem and the helper listens and provides guidance and perspective. An effective helper simply guides, rather than drives, the conversation while allowing the person to essentially discover and evaluate solutions on their own. As a mentor to sophomore students on academic probation, I meet regularly with my mentees and have incorporated this approach when we sit down and try to find solutions for academic success.

The lessons I have learned through the Institute have also guided me in my role as the mentor, helper, or coach when working with my colleagues or with mentees who are in library school. Learning when it is appropriate to offer guidance, when to give advice or opinions, or when it is best to sit back quietly and let others find their own paths is most certainly an art form—something that I look forward to working on over the course of my career and as I continue to connect with others in the field.

Special APA Library Leader — APALA Founder, Dr. Lourdes Collantes

by Jeremiah Paschke-Wood

With the Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association nearing its 35th Anniversary celebration, we continue remembering and honoring some of those instrumental in the founding of the organization. One such person is Lourdes Collantes.

Lourdes Collantes was born in a province 30 miles from Manila in the Philippines, one of seven children (McCook, 1998). The daughter of a professor at the University of the Philippines and a rice mill owner, she received her B.A. from the University of the Philippines. After helping with a cataloging project at UP as an undergrad, she decided to pursue a Master’s in Library Science, enrolling at Rutgers University in 1958.

At Rutgers, Collantes received her Master’s of Library Science degree and would also eventually pick up a M.Ed. and Ph.D. (in 1992) due to the scarcity of library jobs at the time. She served as an intern with East Orange (N.J.) Public Library for 14 months before returning to the Philippines to serve as Librarian-in-charge of the Social Sciences Division and Humanities and Reference at the University of the Philippines from 1961-67.

Named Assistant Professor in 1966, she also served as the Head of Acquisitions from 1968-71. In 1972, she became Assistant Librarian at Rutgers University’s Mathematical Sciences Library and then, one year later, became Associate Librarian at State University of New York at Old Westbury. She held this position for 24 years, before being named Acting Director in 1997.

At the 1980 American Library Association conference in New York, Collantes, Suzine Har Nicolescu, Sharad Karkhanis, Conchita Pineda, Henry Chang, Betty Tsai, and Tamiye Trejo Meehan met and decided to found the Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (Yamashita, 2000). Collantes would serve as president of APALA in 1983-84. But her involvement with the organization did not end there; she also chaired the Awards, Nominations and Constitutions and Bylaws Committees. Within the American Library Association, Collantes served on the ALA Awards Committee from 1984-88 and was the chair of the Pay Equity Committee from 1991-93 and chair of David Clift Scholarship Committee in 1986.

Among additional accolades, Collantes was named Delegate to the People to People Library and Information Science Delegation to the People’s Republic of China in 1985, received Professional Development Librarian Research Awards from United University Professions in 1985 and 1987 and received the SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Librarianship in 1994.

She was also well-known in the library field for publications including “Degree of Agreement in Naming Objects and Concepts for Information Retrieval” in the Journal of the American Society for Information Science and edited Asian/Pacific American Librarians: A Cross Cultural Perspective.

Lourdes Collantes could not be reached for this article.

 

References

McCook, K. (1998). “Lourdes Collantes.” Women of Color in Librarianship: An Oral History. Chicago, American Library Association

Yamashita, K. (2000). “Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association—A history of APALA and its founders.” Library Trends49(1), 88-109. Last retrieved June 22, 2014, from: http://www.apalaweb.org/wpsandbox/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/apalahistory.pdf

 

 

Editing assistance provided by Alyssa Jocson.

APALA 2014 Travel Grant Award Recipient–Gerie Ventura at 2014 ALA Annual Conference

APALA Travel Grant Recipient Gerie Ventura Keeps the Library Karma Going

by Ann Matsushima Chu

The Asian Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA) Scholarship and Awards Committee announced the following Travel Grant recipient during the ALA Annual Conference 2014 in Las Vegas:

Gerie Ventura has been a library paraprofessional for almost twenty years and currently is employed as the Circulation Operations Lead at Highline Community College in Des Moines, Washington. While brand new to APALA, Ventura was first introduced to the group and the travel grant through librarian colleague Karen Fernandez. Ventura currently attends Emporia State University on the Portland, Oregon campus with a concentration in Leadership and Administration, and plans to graduate in 2015. Ventura expresses excitement in learning the plans for APALA’s upcoming conference in San Francisco, as well as being open to new opportunities for her involvement and leadership as she finishes up with library school.

Gerie Ventura receives the APALA Travel Grant award from APALA President (2013-2014) Eugenia Beh

At the APALA Executive Board Meeting during the ALA Annual Conference 2014 in Las Vegas, Nev., Gerie Ventura receives the APALA Travel Grant award from APALA President (2013-2014) Eugenia Beh. Photo credit: Florante Ibanez

When asked about her experiences at ALA, Ventura states that she was “on Cloud 9” during most of the 2014 ALA Conference, knowing how overwhelming the conference can be yet fueled by inspiring and empowering conversations with many APALA librarians and other librarians of color. The panel discussions of first-time directors and librarians of color, as well as an OCLC Symposium on the “future of libraries” were most thought provoking and challenging for Ventura.

Ventura makes note on how hearing current APALA President Eileen Bosch share stories about the challenges of assuming leadership roles in libraries has allowed her to feel more confident that meeting her educational goal of completing library school is possible. She is comforted by the fact that there is a network of librarians in and outside of APALA who are happy to lend an ear or offer advice. This open flow of librarians sharing their stories or assistance in the future allows Ventura to feel more comfortable and connected to the community of librarians.

Since Ventura is currently in library school, her primary interests lie in hearing the practical application process of information theory in her classes. While taking a Collection Development class, she enjoyed listening to the librarians from around the nation in the collection management interest group, as they discussed managing multiple digital products and how floating collections affect access to library materials for inner-city/urban public library customers.

Her vision for librarianship stems from the many librarians who have encouraged her throughout her entire educational career. “Keeping the karma going” is Ventura’s motto to putting a friendly, accessible face to librarianship for APA library users and, especially, non-users. Ventura thinks there are many within the vast APA community who are not yet aware of the amazing library services that are available to and for them, at no cost. She excitedly envisions continuing “talking libraries” with her friends and family to inform them of how libraries can enrich their lives, both virtually and face-to-face, and of how to make deeper connections between APA community groups and many libraries that want to serve them.

If you’ve heard about “the big library conference” and have always wanted to attend, Ventura encourages you to apply for the 2015 APALA Travel Grant. She encourages future participants to “make the most out of it by finding workshops and sessions of interest to you and meet as many APALA members and librarians as you can. They will inspire and encourage you!”

Many thanks to Gerie Ventura! Best wishes as you continue your librarianship journey!

 

 

Editing assistance provided by Raymond Wang.

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