Renewal Through Community Affinity by Cynthia Mari Orozco

by Cynthia Mari Orozco

This third essay continues APALA’s advocacy fatigue mini-series. Written by APALA member Cynthia Mari Orozco, who is also the 2015 APALA-sponsored ALA Emerging Leader, this reflective piece is about seeking inspiration and support beyond the library world. Librarianship, as a helping profession, exacts high emotional costs. Because of this, renewal is a crucial aspect of self-care and, therefore, professional development. Library advocacy is one area in which we can strongly see the professional and the personal working and developing each other.

In anticipation of APALA’s 35th Anniversary & Symposium,  we take a closer look at the very human aspect of advocacy work—fatigue. 

~ Melissa I. Cardenas-Dow, APALA Web Content Sub-committee Chair, 2012-Present

 

Cynthia Mari OrozcoPhil Yu, a.k.a. Angry Asian Man, says it best: “Stay angry.” For me as a librarian, this translates as “Stay angry… at inequity in access to information, surveillance in ebooks or censorship.” In relation to library and information activism, this could extend to “Stay passionate… about user-centered services, diverse books and open access.” These examples barely scratch the surface of the many issues for which librarians advocate or combat against.

But being angry, or passionate, requires an incredible amount of effort, time, and strength. It can be extremely taxing to sustain one’s energy. While we still care, a number of factors can beat down on us and cause us fatigue. Maybe an innovative library program you propose isn’t supported by your colleagues or administration. Maybe you hear a colleague oppose the idea of user-centered services. In my professional life, I have come to rely on a number of networks to sustain and invigorate my passion and energy, both in non-library circles and within the greater library community.

Storytime with Traci Kato-Kiriyama at a Tuesday Night Cafe session. July 15, 2014. Photo credit: Cynthia Mari Orozco

Storytime with TNP founder Traci Kato-Kiriyama at a Tuesday Night Cafe session. July 15, 2014. Photo credit: Cynthia Mari Orozco

Shortly after I started working at my current institution, I also became involved with a local group called Tuesday Night Project (TNP), which describes itself as “an Asian American grassroots and volunteer-based organization fiercely devoted to bridging communities by providing programming and interactive spaces for people to connect through artistic expression and strong, creative, community partnerships.” Its main program is Tuesday Night Cafe, which hosts a free, twice a month (April through October) curated program of multidisciplinary visual and performing art, as well as an open mic. I’m usually tired at the end of my work day, but on these particular Tuesdays, I make an effort to go up to Little Tokyo in Los Angeles and dedicate some of my time to this incredible space. Despite often coming into the space tired, preoccupied with projects I’m working on, and maybe sometimes a little demoralized, I’m instantly reenergized by the passion and love that emanate from this space. I surround myself with artists and art lovers, community organizers, educators, students, friends, and everything, everyone, in-between. I talk to people from a wide range of backgrounds, about what they’re doing in their lives, and I become inspired by  amazing people, projects and collaborations. I also have the opportunity to talk about my library ideas without resistance. My ideas are not met with discouraging  comments like, “It won’t work,” or “There’s no money for that” or any other obstacles. Instead, I consistently get positive energy and genuine “That’s incredible!” or “You got this!” For me, the Tuesday Night Cafe space provides an additional forum outside of my institution to ask faculty and students from other universities about their insights on library services. This brings me non-libraryland perspectives into conversations, which can be extremely valuable.

TNPEveryone needs a cheerleader. Surround yourself with positivity and people devoted to making incredible things happen, even if they’re not in libraries. Through my experience with TNP, I’ve gained emotional sustenance, perspective, and friends. Determine what communities, spaces, and individuals complement your professional and personal self to support you now and into the next phase of your life. Ideas and innovation flourish with support. Break out and build a network of support that works for you.

 

Editing assistance provided by Jaena Rae Cabrera and Melissa Cardenas-Dow.

35 Never Looked So Good: APALA Celebrates Anniversary with Symposium

(San Francisco, CA) In celebration of its 35th anniversary, the Asian Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA) will hold a one-day symposium entitled “Building Bridges: Connecting Communities through Librarianship & Advocacy” at the University of San Francisco’s McLaren Conference Center on Thursday, June 25th, 2015.

“We are celebrating and commemorating this milestone in a city that has a deep history and strong presence of Asian Pacific Islanders,” said Gary Colmenar, one of the co-chairs of the APALA 35th Planning Committee. “We are holding this symposium to reflect the work APALA has done in the past and continues to do so. The theme for the symposium reflects what we have been doing to accomplish the organization’s mission. We serve as a bridge between library, archives and museum professionals with the APA communities.” The APALA Symposium will be held right before the American Library Association (ALA) Annual Conference and Exhibition, June 26-30, at the Moscone Center in San Francisco. Additional programs and cultural events are slated during the ALA Annual Conference, June 26-30.

The keynote speaker is Valarie Kaur, an award-winning documentary filmmaker, civil rights lawyer, and interfaith leader who centers her work on storytelling for social change. She has led campaigns on hate crimes, racial profiling, immigration detention, marriage equality, solitary confinement, and the open Internet. Valarie Kaur believes “the way we make change is just as important as the change we make.” She currently serves as Media and Strategy Fellow at Stanford Law School.

Founded in 1980 by librarians of diverse Asian and Pacific ancestries, APALA has long been committed to supporting and providing greater visibility for Asian / Pacific American (APA) professionals in the areas of libraries, archives, and museums (LAMs) and advancing services to APA communities.

Early bird registration starts January 27, 2015 and ends April 3, 2015

For more information, updates, and registration, visit http://apala35th.apalaweb.org/

Event Details:

Who:                Asian Pacific American Librarians’ Association (APALA)

What:               35th Anniversary Symposium entitled “Building Bridges: Connecting

Communities through Librarianship & Advocacy”      

When:              Thursday, June 25th, 2015, 8:00 A.M. to 7:30 P.M.

Where:                        University of San Francisco’s McLaren Conference; Registration

required

Attached:                   Keynote speaker Valarie Kaur – biography

Valarie Kaur

Valarie KaurValarie Kaur is a civil rights lawyer, documentary filmmaker, and faith-rooted organizer who helps communities tell their stories and organize for social change. She has made award-winning films and led multimedia campaigns on a wide range of issues: hate crimes against Sikh and Muslim Americans, racial profiling, gun violence, marriage equality, immigration detention, and solitary confinement. Valarie is a regular television commentator on MSNBC and opinion contributor toCNN, NPR, PBS, The Washington Post, The Huffington Post, and The New York Times. She has reported on the military commissions at Guantanamo and clerked on the Senate Judiciary Committee. Valarie founded Groundswell Movement of 100,000 members, the nation’s largest multi-faith online organizing community known for “dynamically strengthening faith-based organizing in the 21st century.”

A Senior Fellow at Auburn Seminary, she serves as a national Sikh voice who teaches on movement-building for students, organizers, and interfaith groups. She also works with the U.S. State Department to bring these tools to activists around the world, most recently traveling and teaching throughout Myanmar. She earned degrees at Stanford University, Harvard Divinity School, and Yale Law School, where she founded the Yale Visual Law Project to train future lawyers to make films for social and policy change. She is currently the Media and Strategy Fellow at Stanford Law School, where she helps build the movement to keep the Internet free and open, especially for under-served communities.

The Center for American Progress lists Valarie among 13 national progressive faith leaders to watch. She has been called “a standout figure in the world of interfaith organizing and activism and one of eight Asian American “Women of Influence.” A prolific public speaker on college and university campuses, she was also the youngest to deliver the Baccalaureate Commencement Address at Stanford University.

Valarie lives with her husband and filmmaking partner Sharat Raju and their baby boy Kavi Singh in Los Angeles. She believes that “the way we make change is just as important as the change we make.”

For more information on Valarie, visit her website at http://valariekaur.com/. You can also follow her on Twitter at @valariekaur.

Attached: APALA35th Press Release [pdf]

But Am I Really an Activist? Dealing with Impostor Syndrome by Annie Pho

by Annie Pho

APALA is an organization invested in librarians and library workers as people. A significant part of librarianship is advocacy, whether it is on behalf of our organizations, our fellow library workers, or the communities we serve through our libraries and other civic organizations. In anticipation of APALA’s 35th Anniversary & Symposium,  we take a closer look at the very human aspect of advocacy work–fatigue. 

This second essay in APALA’s advocacy fatigue mini-series, written by APALA member Annie Pho, is about impostor syndrome. She writes about how impostor syndrome relates to librarianship, advocacy and activism.  

~ Melissa I. Cardenas-Dow, APALA Web Content Sub-committee Chair, 2012-Present

 

Annie Pho, 2014When I was first asked to write an article about being an activist librarian, I was really surprised that someone asked me to write about activism in libraries at all. I have never called myself an activist. To me, activists are very organized, well-spoken (and outspoken), proactive in spreading the messages of their cause, and inspire others to be better. While I do care about social justice, I often find myself struggling with the right response to those who critique social justice movements. I consider myself someone who is constantly trying to learn how to be a better citizen, not necessarily someone who inspires others. That’s when I realized the depths of impostor syndrome—always feeling like you are impersonating the role that you currently fulfill. Impostor syndrome is an issue in our profession, and something that permeates many spaces in librarianship.

What is Impostor Syndrome?

Impostor syndrome was first coined by Pauline Rose Clance and Suzanne Imes, who studied the feelings of inadequacy of high achieving women. While women are not the only ones who suffer from this syndrome, it’s not surprising that librarians (a profession that is predominantly female) battle this syndrome. The Geek Feminist Wiki defines impostor syndrome as “a situation where someone feels like an impostor or fraud because they think that their accomplishments are nowhere near as good as those of the people around them.” The negative effects of impostor syndrome can include “generalized anxiety, lack of self confidence, depression, and frustration related to inability to meet self-imposed standards of achievement” (Clance & Imes, 1978). Feeling these effects over a long period of time is exhausting and leads to burnout.

So what does it mean to be an impostor activist? Or more importantly, what does it mean to be an activist? The word activist suggests a sense of authority or knowledge, the ability to organize, and have the right response to naysayers. I constantly feel like I am not doing enough, especially in comparison to those whom I consider to be great activists, those who seem to have a lot of impact in their communities. There’s no way I could do the same. However, thinking like this has a negative impact on your self-esteem and can really hinder your own ability to be the person you want to be. People often express the sentiment that it’s hard to even try to advocate for any social cause because in the end, it doesn’t matter. That change is too hard to create and it’s easier to ignore it (if you have the privilege to do so). It’s extremely difficult to measure any impact that an individual can make on larger societal issues. It’s not always something tangible that you can see. As a result, I think this also adds to the impostor syndrome in seeing yourself as an activist.

Getting Over Impostor Syndrome

It wasn’t until a friend (and someone I look up to as an activist) told me that activism means different things to different people. It was then that I began to understand that there is no one way to be an activist. You can contribute to the cause in many different ways. Organizations might need people to do data entry, or to write, or to design graphics. It’s important for me to remember that even doing a little thing is better than not doing anything at all.

There are a few tactics that you can use to combat impostor syndrome. A recent study published in College & Research Libraries looked at impostor syndrome among librarians and recommended that those who have these feelings should distinguish between feeling incompetent and actually lacking the skills needed to do the job. This is an important distinction, figuring out what is just how you feel versus what you are actually capable of. Asking for feedback and communicating with peers can also help quell these feelings. I participate and sometimes moderate the #critlib Twitter chats, which helps me connect with other librarians who have an interest in critical librarianship. Talking to the #critlib community gives me plenty of things to think about and keeps me connected to the activist librarian community.

I’m not sure if you can ever truly get rid of impostor syndrome, but I think it’s something that you work on over time as you build upon your experiences (and your self-confidence hopefully). For me, building community helps me realize I am not alone and that we are all continually trying to learn and improve ourselves as activists. All we can do is try to be better and do good for the world.

 

Further Reading

Perceived Inadequacy: A Study of the Imposter Phenomenon among College and Research Librarians by Melanie Clark, Kimberly Vardeman, and Shelley Barba

Low Self-Esteem and the Academic Librarian. Maybe it is just me. It is probably just me. by Erin Miller

The Imposter Phenomenon in High Achieving Women: Dynamics and Therapeutic Intervention by Pauline Rose Clance and Suzanne Imes

 

Editing assistance provided by Jaena Rae Cabrera and Melissa Cardenas-Dow.

Advocacy Fatigue: It Should Be a Thing by Melissa Cardenas-Dow

by Melissa I. Cardenas-Dow

In anticipation of APALA’s 35th Anniversary & Symposium celebration in June 25, 2015, APALA Web Content Sub-committee is introducing a mini-series of articles focusing on advocacy. We appreciate the significance of advocacy work, which can come in many different forms and can focus on many different aspects of library and community engagement. Many APALA members engage in advocacy as part of their work.

As APALA is an organization invested in librarians and library workers as people, we wanted to shine light on a very human aspect of advocacy work–fatigue. We had asked several APALA members to think about advocacy, activism, and the toll such work often takes. Four APALA members have consented to reflect on their experiences of advocacy, fatigue and renewal. We will be publishing their work through the rest of the 2014-2015 operational year.

In this first essay of the mini-series, I write about advocacy and activism work, and coming to terms with one’s own limitations and need for renewal.  ~ Melissa I. Cardenas-Dow, APALA Web Content Sub-committee Chair, 2012-Present

 

Image of Melissa Cardenas-Dow

Recently, I’ve come to embrace the fact that I can do intellectual work much better than physical labor. I like to think about things. I find great meaning in the work of connecting abstract concepts together. That type of work excites and energizes me.

What excites me even more is the prospect of doing intellectual work that makes a difference in people’s lives. For me, it’s not enough to think about ideas, how they often end up written or somehow represented as some tangible thing by scholars and academic experts in different fields, and how these knowledge objects must be made accessible to researchers who would need to access them for their own scholarly work.

I am well aware that I am just one among many who take seriously the charge of advocacy and activism within APALA and ALA. Many of us conduct scholarly activism, not just advocacy. Many of us immerse ourselves into scholarly, academic literature and are guided by theoretical perspectives. But, in the end, we advocate–we speak up, we write, we do–for the library worker community and the community of patrons we serve through our libraries.

As Sara Goldrick-Rab says, “It takes time, energy, emotional labor, and a thick skin. It is usually an unpaid gig.” Even within a supportive environment, surrounded by friends, allies and colleagues who think and say positive things about your activist labor, the tolls of such work on a person can be immense.

I make a conscious effort to infuse my professional work, particularly my involvement with professional library associations and groups, with my own personal strengths and social justice advocacy. I select assignments and positions that, I think, will allow me to contribute, help me build some skills that I am interested in improving, and further my personal, professional, and academic interests in equity, diversity, and inclusion in modern American society. Most of the time, finding these in most tasks aren’t very difficult to do. But, they do take a level of attentiveness that can wear on a person. Mostly because the tasks are so plentiful and vast, but my time, heart, and spirit are limited. This circumstance is an easy recipe for burnout.

How does one know one is experiencing advocacy fatigue? Here are the signs that tell me I am in great need of some down time.

The negative, defeatist voices are getting louder. They say things like, “What’s the point?” or “Do you really think you’re making a difference? Lonesome you? The system is bigger than you.” Advocacy work is the work of heart and spirit. Resilient as heart and spirit are, they are also easily depleted. Maintaining a hopeful heart, mind and spirit can become work, in and of itself. When that happens, my internal critics gain ground. I take that as my cue to re-focus, find more ways to get positivity into my daily intake. 

Misanthropy starts coloring my outlook and attitude. I generally have a very strong appreciation for absurdist humor. Normally, my penchant for inspiration and joy balances this out, preventing me from tumbling down the cynic’s rabbit hole of mental despair. I believe these lenses–optimism and criticism–are important to hold in tension of each other in order to maintain an advocate’s position. For me, it’s enough to focus on which effort I’d like to get behind, rather than focusing on an outcome that is the result of taking a long-view of activist work. When this balance gets disturbed, however, I start disliking the perspectives, and the people associated with them, that I have cultivated for years. 

The desire for an apathetic outlook becomes stronger. When I am so, so tired of advocacy work, I start fantasizing about letting it all go, stopping, and focusing on more immediate concerns, such as my house, my husband, my children, our pets. There are plenty of other, more capable social justice warriors out there, right? 

In many ways, feeling burned out, especially these states-of-mind I had described, is a result of a confluence of modern living and of balancing domestic, professional, and other obligations, all at once. I have just pulled out some aspects of how I experience fatigue, in general, and focused on the ones that are most relevant to the advocacy work I do with ALA and APALA.

 Living a meaningful life isn’t supposed to be easy. The struggle with fatigue is part of the lifestyle. How do you keep your spirits and heart positive? How do you keep your mind focused on the prize? Let us know in the comments!

 

Editing assistance provided by Jaena Rae Cabrera.

New website launched for APALA 35th Anniversary & Symposium

It’s time to start getting excited!

In anticipation of next year’s upcoming APALA 35th Anniversary & Symposium, we’ve launched a new microsite:

apala35th.apalaweb.org

There you’ll find all the latest news and information about our 35th Anniversary & Symposium in one handy place. Check it out now and bookmark it for future reference ease.

 


And in case you missed it, the deadline for submissions has been extended to October 31.

We know you’re awesome, so how about sharing what you know or have done with the rest the rest of us? Don’t wait, submit today!

 

 

 

APALA 35th Anniversary and Symposium Call for Proposals


UPDATE: Visit the Call for Proposal page on the new APALA 35th Anniversary & Symposium website!


 

Asian / Pacific American Librarians Association
35
th Anniversary & Symposium
San Francisco • June 25, 2015
Building Bridges: Connecting Communities Through Librarianship & Advocacy
Embracing the Past
Engaging the Present
Empowering the Future

The Asian / Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA) turns 35 in 2015! To commemorate this milestone, APALA is holding a one-day symposium on Thursday, June 25 at McLaren Hall on the University of San Francisco campus. Additional programs and cultural events will be organized during the American Library Association Annual Conference.

Founded in 1980 by librarians of diverse Asian and Pacific ancestries, APALA has long been committed to supporting and providing greater visibility for Asian / Pacific American (APA) professionals in the areas of libraries, archives, and museums (LAMs) and advancing services to APA communities. The 35th Anniversary & Symposium is an opportune time to reflect upon and continue to execute its mission by providing information and/or training on: library programs and resources for APA communities; becoming successful library leaders and advocates; and creating linkages with other library associations and APA organizations.

APALA has always aimed to serve as a bridge between LAM professionals and APA communities; LAM professionals of diverse backgrounds; and libraries and APA communities. The symposium continues this theme, bringing in the idea of building bridges in all its connotations — physical, temporal, historical, virtual, individual, organizational, local, and global.

Building Bridges: Connecting Communities Through Librarianship & Advocacy

  • Embracing the Past — Build on APALA’s vision and learn about proven tools and practices for serving APA communities
  • Engaging the Present Find out how to make a difference here and now for our organizations and beyond through leadership and community building
  • Empowering the Future Pave the way to success through lessons and tips on advocacy and professional development

The event is intended to foster discussion address questions such as:

  •  How have libraries and cultural institutions served APA communities? How can APALA create and ensure more programs and tools for APA communities, both physical and virtual, local and global?
  • What kinds of bridges have APALA, and libraries in general, built with APA communities? How can APALA and APA information professionals continue to make alliances and build communities?
  • How have APALA and library leaders advocated for information services to APA communities? What lessons and advice do they have to share?
  • What are the challenges facing APA librarians and communities? What are the new information and technology trends? How can information professionals improve their knowledge and skills for the benefit of APA communities?
  • How can APALA maintain its active role in creating a culturally diverse and inclusive society? How can libraries ensure that APA communities have the information they need to participate fully in society?

With its iconic bridges, San Francisco provides an ideal backdrop for these discussions. The fact that it is also the site of several key landmarks and significant historical events for APAs, such as Angel Island, the I-Hotel, the first Ethnic Studies Department, makes it an even more appropriate place to connect past with the present and future.


 

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

APALA invites you to submit a proposal that addresses the symposium’s theme of building bridges that highlight the vital links between libraries and communities; librarians and library users; ideas and successful outcomes. The ideal presentation would fall under one of these tracks and focus on diverse communities, particularly Asian / Pacific Americans.

Program Tracks

a. Community Building and Outreach

  • Designing effective outreach programs that engage and reflect local community needs
  • Developing best practices and models with respect to issues affecting APA and pan- ethnic communities
  • Building successful collaborations on programming for all ages with different communities and library organizations

b. Cultural Heritage and Educational Materials

  • Developing resources and building library collections related to APAs
  • Creating and preserving APA archival materials (e.g., oral history, community papers, musical recordings, films, etc.) and developing institutional and digital repositories
  • Creating materials that provide APA visibility and representation in a range of formats, such as films, websites, exhibitions, digital storytelling, music, and print literature
  • Developing programs through collaborations with government, non-profit organizations, and local community groups that preserve, maintain, and promote APA cultures and histories

c. Leadership and Advocacy

  • Training and mentoring individuals to acquire essential skills and understanding in working with a diverse staff and clientele
  • Developing essential skills to be effective advocates and change agents.
  • Developing ways to encourage engagement and participation toward making a positive change in the workplace and society
  • Exploring different leadership models that address issues such as, empowerment, micro- aggression, changing organizational culture, consensus building, and mentoring

d. Interpersonal and Career Growth

  • Addressing issues related to workplace dynamics and structure (e.g., cultural competence, conflict resolution and mediation, mentoring, re-organization, staff and professional issues, institutional change)
  • Acquiring or providing training for skills for career change or growth (e.g., technology, public relations, social media, fundraising, grant writing, assessment, management, and planning)
  • Creating a culture that encourages learning and growth as well as trust and respect

PROGRAM FORMATS

Workshop Session (75 minutes)

A group session with facilitator(s) who provide an interactive workshop on a project or topic. The session could be on music, research, video/film making, music, archiving, oral history, outreach programming, advocacy training, or related topics.

Roundtable Session (75 minutes)

A facilitated a discussion amongst presenters and audience participants on a particular topic or broader issue. Submissions should include multiple viewpoints and diverse voices. The majority of the allotted time should be devoted to discussion involving audience members.

Paper/Panel Presentation (75 minutes)

Presentations may cover a specialized topic from different perspectives or a general topic in- depth. Presenters should provide sufficient time for audience discussion. The proposal should specify a moderator who will organize the panel and regulate time. Individual paper submissions could be added in a panel program.

Poster Session (60 minutes)

A creative visual representation of a topic that provides an informal way to convey research, projects, services or ideas of interest to attendees. Presenters will be expected to set-up and host their poster during the allotted time.

RULES FOR SUBMISSION

Please include the following information in your proposal:

Primary Contact: Name, title, institutional affiliation, e-mail address, phone number Participants: name, title, affiliation, email address, and phone number
Proposal information:

  • Program Title
  • Descriptive Abstract for the program booklet (80 word maximum)
  • Program Abstract to include up to three learning outcomes (300 word maximum)

Program Track (select one of the following):

  • Community Building and Outreach
  • Cultural Heritage and Educational Materials
  • Leadership and Advocacy
  • Interpersonal and Career Growth

Program Format (select one of the following):

  • Workshop Session
  • Roundtable Session
  • Paper/Panel Presentation
  • Poster Session

Audio-visual needs:
Data projector and screen will be provided.

Deadline

All proposals must be received by midnight PST on October 31, 2014 as a Word document to apala35proposals@gmail.com. Notifications of proposal selection will be made beginning November 15, 2014.

Questions

Questions may be sent to the APALA 35 Program Committee at apala35proposals@gmail.com.

Non-Commercial Policy

APALA programs are non-commercial educational learning experiences. Under no circumstances should a workshop, session or poster presentation be used for direct promotion of a speaker’s product, service, or other self-interest.

Additional Requirements

All selected program presenters must be registered for the APALA 35th Anniversary & Symposium in order to present.

Presenters are responsible for paying the conference registration fee, travel, and lodging.

Presenters may be invited to use a format other than the one(s) selected or might be invited to co- present with others who have proposed similar topics.