Spotlight on Hanna Lee: An Emerging Leader

by Melissa Cardenas-Dow

Hanna Lee is a new librarian professional and is currently a Youth Services Librarian at the Princeton Public Library in New Jersey. Librarianship is not her first career, however. She spent quite a bit of time as a teacher in middle school and high school and as a student services staff member in a higher education setting.

Of her path to professional librarianship, Hanna writes:

After living in Mozambique for a little bit and volunteering at an international school library there, I finally decided to pursue librarianship. It was something I’d been planning to do since I was an avid library visitor as a child! I went to Rutgers University’s School of Communication and Information, started interning at my current library, graduated in May 2013, and started working full-time there that August. I’m very, very lucky to be at a wonderful library with an incredibly engaged community.

Hanna is also a new APALA member, having just joined our association in the summer of 2013. Of her involvement, she writes:

I joined APALA last summer to get connected to other APA librarians. Having grown up in a predominantly [racially] white Midwestern suburb, and then having spent the majority of my adult life prior to now in largely black urban environments, I see APALA as a great way to join a larger community of people/librarians with whom I have some specific shared experiences. The website, the emails, and the community at large have been huge resources for me already, even if I haven’t yet become as active within the organization as I would like. This year, I was particularly glad to be a member of APALA during the robust discussion following BCALA’s statement regarding the 2016 ALA Annual Conference in Orlando, Florida. It’s heartening to be a part of a body of thoughtful professionals who take each other’s concerns seriously.

When asked about her decision to join ALA’s Emerging Leaders program, Hanna’s response:

Since I’m always on the lookout for opportunities for professional growth and enrichment, I learned about the ALA Emerging Leaders program on the ALA website. My library is an extremely supportive place, and we are encouraged to get involved in local and national associations. I was particularly interested in having a chance to meet and work with “emerging leaders” from all over the country and beyond. Since I’m still very new to the profession and ALA, it was really nice to have a more structured, intimate introduction to all of this.

For Hanna’s ALA-EL project, she worked with Team E to develop a calculator that can quantitatively translate the value of local youth-oriented services and programs. Team E’s project is sponsored by ALSC (Association for Library Service to Children). Of this project, Hanna writes:

 ALSC charged my group to create a library value calculator for youth services. Basically, an online form that calculates a library’s value based on usage, like this one on ALA’s website: http://www.ala.org/advocacy/advleg/advocacyuniversity/toolkit/makingthecase/
library_calculator. Except just specifically focused on youth services.

This project was intended to be of use to librarians in underserved communities who may benefit from such a tool when advocating for maintaining or increasing services. The more research our group did, though, the more we started to think that this project could not actually be accurate or helpful, since value calculators rely on a very simple return on investment model that fails to take into account the many complex, social benefits of library youth services.

So instead, we offered a glimpse into some of the other valuation methods being used in other areas—public libraries at large, school libraries, museums and other non-profits—and recommended that ALSC continue this project with a task force and future Emerging Leader teams. At the Annual Conference 2014, the ALSC Executive Board told us that they have decided to move forward with our recommendations, which was very exciting.

The ALA Emerging Leaders program is a great way for participants to become more involved with ALA, the professional library organization in the United States, and its affiliate organizations. When asked what she recommends aspiring ELs do to apply and participate in the program, especially those who may be interested but reluctant, Hanna has this to say:

Do it! It’s a great way to get connected to passionate people and a wealth of resources, quickly. I would also encourage incoming Emerging Leaders to take some care in the selection of their project, if possible. The ALSC staff liaison and member guide on my project both went above and beyond, which made a huge difference in my experience. It also seems that the program leaders are truly interested in the feedback of participants (for example, they’ve made the cohorts much smaller, which was a hugely positive change), and I think the program is just going to continue to get better and better.

ELHannaFrontThank you, Hanna, for sharing your great insight. We hope APALA members are encouraged to take part in the Emerging Leaders program.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Editing by Jaena Rae Cabrera.

 

Spotlight on Raymond Pun: An Emerging Leader

by Melissa Cardenas-Dow

You may remember Raymond Pun when he was still working at The New York Public Library. He also wrote a “What’s Your Normal?” essay for APALA that was published in May 2013. Since then, Ray, as he wants to be called, has moved to Shanghai, China, where he now works as a reference and research services librarian for the New York University campus there.

Of the beginnings of his librarian career, Ray writes:

I’ve been working in libraries since 2006 as an undergraduate intern and student worker. And like many people that I know, I just fell into the career of being a librarian. I was encouraged by my mentors in college to pursue a degree in library science since I was already working in one of the best research libraries in the world: The New York Public Library: Stephen A. Schwarzman Building.

I went to City University of New York: Queens College for my MLS, and then later received an MA in East Asian Studies from St. John’s University, my alma mater. Initially I was getting an M.A. in Middle Eastern Studies, but due to the rise of the Arab Spring and ongoing conflicts in the Middle East (particularly in Egypt and Syria where I wanted to study), it just didn’t seem like a viable idea to pursue that course of study since I wouldn’t be able to visit those countries at all. So I switched regional studies. Maybe in the future I’ll go back to finish up my M.A. in Middle Eastern Studies.

For my first professional job, I was promoted as a librarian in NYPL in 2010. Later, I was encouraged to apply for the ALA-EL program and for my current position as a reference and research services librarian in New York University Shanghai in China. I’m currently in Shanghai, collaboratively building the library collections and services to support the NYU community. It has been a fascinating experience and a great opportunity to start a new job and work abroad in a startup environment.

Since moving to Shanghai, Ray has scaled back his involvement with APALA. Of his most recent involvement in APALA, Ray writes:

Most recently, I’ve contributed articles to the newsletter and content for the website, volunteered my time to represent APALA in the exhibition booth at ALA annual and APALA’s poster in the ALA Diversity and Outreach Fair. I’ve also managed to talk to people about the benefits of joining APALA and it has worked! So in that sense, I’ve been an “unofficial ambassador” for APALA. Since I am working abroad, it can be tricky to coordinate my involvement with the organization. Soon, I hope to be more active!

When asked about his decision to apply to the ALA Emerging Leaders program, Ray says:

I decided to apply to the ALA-EL program because I was interested in working on a group project that extended beyond my workplace, but I didn’t know I would also be moving to China at that time. It became a “global project collaboration,” in that sense. In the beginning, I also didn’t think I could pull it off, but I did and it turned out to be a very good learning experience. I found out about this program, maybe 3 years ago, from NYPL colleagues who also went through the ALA-EL program. They said it was a good way to learn more about ALA and its leadership structure. I thought about being more active in ALA, but didn’t know where to begin so the ALA-EL program seemed like a good start.

Image of Team G's poster display during the 2014 ALA Annual Conference at Las Vegas, NV.

Poster presentation of Team G, ALA Emerging Leaders Poster Session & Reception, Friday, June 27, 2014, ALA Annual Las Vegas, NV. Photo credit: Pun collection.

Ray worked with fellow APALA member, Monnee Tong, on the same ALA-EL project.

For my EL project, my team and I worked on an oral history video featuring two prominent Chinese American librarians who have contributed a lot to the profession. Since my project was sponsored by CALA (Chinese American Library Association), this was timely and appropriate. The two librarians are Dr. Lois Mai Chan from University of Kentucky and Dr. Tze-Chung Li from Dominican University. My project specifically focused on Dr. Lois Mai Chan. We interviewed her and some of her former students about the influence and impact Chan had on our profession. It was a lot of work, but it was also fun and rewarding. I worked closely with Monnee Tong from San Diego Public Library. She was my partner in crime on this video project. She was great to work with!

Image of 2014 ALA-EL Team G's poster.

2014 ALA-EL Team G poster, pt. 1. Click image to zoom. Photo credit: Pun collection.

Image of 2014 ALA-EL Team G's poster.

2014 ALA-EL Team G poster, pt. 2. Click on image to zoom. Photo credit: Pun collection.

We asked Ray if he could give advice to anyone aspiring to take part in the ALA-EL program. He writes:

I would say — just apply for it. It’s good to apply for things and learn about different application processes. And if you get accepted (great!) but not get sponsored by an association, you should still participate if you can. The way I see it, ALA-EL provides a little bit of networking, resume/CV boosting, but there’s definitely a strong learning component. If you are interested in designing a project and working in a collaborative team, then this is perfect for you because you’ll learn a lot about teamwork, communication, leadership, and project and time management. All of these are great experiences to put on your resume/CV, but also great interview stories to tell future employers.

For your ALA-EL application, focus on something unique about yourself–what do you think you are doing or can provide that many people can’t? What are some challenges and obstacles that you overcame? Those character-defining moments can make you really stand out from a pool of applicants. Being part of APALA also gives you a wide connection to people who have participated in the EL program. They can give you advice on your essays, look over your resume/CV, or help brainstorm as well. So you aren’t alone in the process!

ray_trading_card Ray was one of two CALA-sponsored 2014 Emerging Leaders.

Thank you very much, Ray. APALA is very proud and lucky to have you in our association. We look forward to your continuing involvement.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Editing assistance provided by Jaena Rae Cabrera.

Spotlight on Monnee Tong: An Emerging Leader

by Melissa Cardenas-Dow

APALA member Monnee Tong has just finished her ALA Emerging Leaders experience with the rest of the 2014 ALA-EL class. She is a librarian at the San Diego Public Library system, working in the newly built Central Library @ Joan Λ Irwin Jacobs Common, the central branch of the system. Monnee has been at her position in San Diego since June 2012, when she was hired right after graduation from the iSchool at the University of Washington. She holds a B.A. in the History of Art from the University of California, Berkeley.

Of her career path to librarianship, Monnee writes:

Before I became a librarian, I worked in educational publishing, a very different professional environment from public libraries (even though they both involve books!)… It’s been a whirlwind two years, jam-packed with a whole lot of learning, but it’s all been worth it.

What I love most about being a librarian is what I missed in publishing—people! I love connecting with different people, whether they are my supportive and collaborative co-workers at SDPL, the teen interns I supervise in our new multimedia lab, the partner organizations we work with to bring free services and programs to the community, or the patron who just discovered the oversize section in Art & Music. People make my job rewarding, challenging, and never boring.

Monnee is a new APALA member and is part of the 2013-2015 Picture Book Literature Committee, which is responsible for selecting the awardees of the annual Asian American Literature prize for picture books. For Monnee, the work of the APALA Picture Book Literature Committee has a strong personal connection:

Although I’m from diverse California, I grew up in a rural town in the Sierra Foothills with almost no Asian Pacific American peers, especially none with parents who were immigrants like mine. I was always searching (and still searching!) for characters in books who resembled my experience in some way, shape or form. I’m really happy to be part of this committee so I can learn about and promote API authors and stories.

Monnee’s ALA Emerging Leader team project is an interesting study in virtual collaboration. Of it, she writes:

Our Emerging Leader group (which included fellow ELs Ray Pun, Sam Suber, and Leila Rod-Welch,) worked on the project “Telling Chinese American Librarians’ Stories” for the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA). We created two short videos about notable Chinese American librarians Dr. Lois Mai Chan and Dr. Tze-chung Li. Both videos can be found on the CALA YouTube channel for your viewing pleasure.

I worked on the video about Dr. Lois Mai Chan with Ray Pun. (You may recognize her name if you read “Cataloging and Classification” in library school.) The big challenge was how to work on a video about Dr. Chan, who lives in Kentucky, and collaborate with Ray, who lives in Shanghai. I got pretty good at figuring out what time it was in Shanghai!

We also received a lot of help from the School of Library and Information Science at the University of Kentucky (UK) where Dr. Chan is Professor Emeritus. UK found these amazing vintage photos of Dr. Chan and filmed several interviews for us. We took the footage and edited it in iMovie and pared all the material down to a 13-minute video.

This project gave me the opportunity to build my video editing skills, to learn about a venerable and accomplished figure in the Chinese American and library communities, and to connect with CALA. Right before we started the project, I was assigned to coordinate San Diego Central Library’s multimedia lab (the IDEA Lab,) and had just taken an iMovie workshop. The EL project gave me the opportunity to really work on my editing skills in iMovie and now I feel I can ‘graduate’ to either Adobe Premiere or Final Cut Pro.

Check out our final product on CALA’s YouTube channel.

For the convenience of our readers, we have embedded Team G’s video on Dr. Lois Mai Chan in this post. Please view the video above.

Monnee offers these pieces of advice to anyone interested in participating in the 2015 ALA Emerging Leaders cohort:

I would advise anyone thinking about applying to ensure that you have the time to devote to the program, because it does take a significant amount of time (at least in my opinion it did!). At times, it was reminiscent of library school (which I did online), so I’m glad that the two didn’t coincide. I would suggest that anyone currently in an online program apply later. That way, you won’t have another online project in addition to your current coursework.

When I was thinking of applying, I found this post from Abby the Librarian helpful (although I should have paid more attention to the fifth bullet point, addressing public, children’s, and teen librarians—Abby, you were right!). If you know someone that went through the program you can talk to, reach out to her/him. I didn’t know anyone but relied on what I read online, and I wish I had reached out to people to get a better sense of what the program entailed.

Despite the time involved, I’m still glad I did the EL program. I got to attend my first ALA Midwinter and Annual Conferences, meet library folk from around the country and world, and be part of a project that gives back to the Chinese American and library communities. I’m also so grateful to my colleagues and mentors at my library, who were all so supportive and excited for me, and proud that I was representing them to the greater library community.

If you’re thinking about applying, feel free to reach out to me—you can find me on Twitter @librarianmo or at monneetong.com. Good luck!

Monnee, we are very happy and proud that you are among us in APALA!

Image of Monnee Tong ALA Emerging Leader 2014.Again, should you wish to contact Monnee regarding the ALA Emerging Leaders program, please find her on Twitter @librarianmo or through her blog, Monnee Tong, Librarian.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Editing assistance by Jaena Rae Cabrera.

Spotlight on Annie Pho: An Emerging Leader

by Jaena Rae Cabrera

Annie Pho is an Academic Resident Librarian at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), where she works in reference and instruction. At UIC, she actively builds campus partnerships with the Asian American Resource and Cultural Center, the Asian American Studies Department, and the Gender and Women Studies Department, where she works with faculty and staff to investigate ways the library may best support their students. She has a Bachelor’s degree in Art History from San Francisco State University and graduated from Indiana University, Indianapolis with her MLS. Her research interests include diversity and stereotypes in librarianship, playful design, and critical pedagogy in information literacy instruction.

Annie was selected as an ALA Emerging Leader for 2014 and her team’s project is to assist ALCTS (Association for Library Collections & Technical Services) in determining best practices for the division’s social media presence. The ALA Emerging Leaders program is intended to be a leadership development program for new library workers who have less than 5 years of experience working at a professional or paraprofessional level in a library.

On her time with APALA, Annie writes:

I’ve been an APALA member since 2013, so not very long! I joined because I wanted to be connected to other Asian and Pacific Islander American librarians. I attended the JCLC conference in 2012 and met many APALA members. Once I found my first full-time librarian position, I joined APALA! It’s been a great experience so far.

At the last ALA in Chicago, I attended the What’s Your Normal discussion and found it very valuable. I’m looking forward to attending more APALA events in the future.

APALA helped me feel connected to some of my fellow ELs, although we did not have much time as a larger group to talk to each other. Also, Melissa Cardenas-Dow, a former Emerging Leader and active APALA member, wrote my letter of recommendation for the EL program. Without her input and assistance, I wouldn’t have been able to participate. She’s a fantastic librarian and someone I look up to. Many of the APALA members I have been fortunate enough to work with or meet also serve as inspiration to me.

On being an ALA Emerging Leader, she writes:

I was inspired to apply because so many cool librarians that I look up to were former ELs. I didn’t think I’d be accepted but I thought it wouldn’t hurt to apply. I’m a new librarian and haven’t gotten involved with leadership on the ALA level. I hoped the EL program would shed some light on the process and also help me understand how ALA is organized. It’s a large, bureaucratic organization, and can be hard to understand the hierarchies that exist. The EL program did help me understand that. I was also hoping to meet with and work with other new professionals, and that definitely has happened.

The ALA-EL application process was pretty straight-forward but I still asked a lot of former ELs for help on my application. In particular, these two blog posts really helped me, Sarah Bryce Kozla’s post So You Want to be an ALA Emerging Leader and Anita Dryden’s post Emerging Leaders and Professional Involvement. I also emailed them both to ask for advice on my application. The hardest part of the application is telling a compelling story about yourself and understanding what you would have to gain from the program. I struggle to write about myself but the people reading the applications need to know what leadership potential you have, so the application is not the time to be humble. I was not sponsored by any groups but when you turn your application in, you check off the divisions you are a member of. It’s a good way to get support to be an Emerging Leader.

I am working on a project for ALCTS on helping them revamp their social media presence. What is funny is that none of my EL Team members are ALCTS members but we were all drawn to this project because it’s very applicable in our everyday work. We sent out a survey to all technical services library staff to get a sense of what they like or don’t like about ALCTS, and how they use social media for professional development.

So far I’ve really enjoyed the program. I love my Team! I couldn’t ask for a better group of people to work with. They are funny, smart, and dedicated professionals. Additionally, the ELs get to participate in webinars through the months between ALA MW and ALA Annual. The last one was on microaggressions in LIS, which I thought was a great topic. The best part about EL is meeting other new professionals, and that it gives you a leg up in becoming more involved with ALA. If there is a committee you want to join, or a division you aspire to be a leader in, being an EL really helps you get your name out.

annieTo learn more about Annie’s 2014 ALA Emerging Leader project, please see ALA-EL 2014 Team C’s project website.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Editing assistance by Melissa Cardenas-Dow and Alyssa Jocson.

Summer 2014 APALA Newsletter is Out!

The latest issue of the APALA newsletter is now available. See what APALA has planned for ALA Annual 2014. A schedule of events is included. This issue also has articles that recap APALA events at ALA Midwinter 2014 in Philadelphia.  It also includes very important amendments to APALA’s constitution and bylaws, which will be discussed at the Membership Meeting at ALA Annual 2014 (Sunday, June 29, 2014, 8:30 am to 10 am in LVCC-N119). Download your copy!

Regular Registration for APALA @ ALA14 Still Open!

Registration for the APALA Tour and the APALA Literature Banquet are still open!

Tour of the Innovative Zappos Headquarters and the Downtown Project Hosted by APALA

Please join us for an APALA fundraising event with a tour of the fabulous Zappos corporate headquarters and the community-focused Downtown Project, both owned by Asian-American leader Tony Hsieh. Your donation supports APALA’s scholarships and awards including the ALA Emerging Leaders Sponsorship and the Sheila Suen Lai Research Grant, plus events like our upcoming 35th Anniversary Celebration in 2015!

We will meet at Flamingo Las Vegas Hotel on Friday, June 27, 2014 at 10:30 a.m. and return at 2:30 p.m​. Transportation will be provided, and we hope you can come and network with other librarians over lunch downtown! (lunch included with registration)

Flamingo Las Vegas Hotel
3555 South Las Vegas Blvd.
Las Vegas, NV 89109

Regular Registration for Members (June 8 – June 25) $ 30.00
Registration for Non-Members (June 8 – June 25) $ 35.00
Onsite/Late Registration (after June 25) $ 40.00

To register: http://www.apalaweb.org/resources/registration/

Celebrate the Best in Asian/Pacific American Literature at the 2014 APALA Literature Awards Banquet

The annual awards program will be held from 5:30-8:30 p.m. on Saturday June 28, 2014 at KJ Dim Sum & Seafood Restaurant in conjunction with the 2014 ALA Annual Conference. Several winning authors have confirmed in attending the banquet.

Children’s Literature Winner: Cynthia Kadohata. The Thing About Luck.
Picture Book Winner: Ji-li Jiang. Red Kite, Blue Kite.
Picture Book Honor: Marissa Moss. Barbed Wire Baseball, illustrated by Yuko Shimizu.
Young Adult Literature Winner: Leza Lowitz and Shogo Oketani. Jet Black and the Ninja Wind.
Adult Non-Fiction Winner: Cindy I-Fen Cheng. Citizens of Asian America: Democracy and Race during the Cold War

Following the formal presentation and dinner buffet, authors will be available for book signing.

Restaurant information:

KJ Dim Sum & Seafood Restaurant
3700 W. Flamingo Rd.
Las Vegas, 89103

Regular Registration for Members (June 8 – June 26) $ 40.00
Registration for Non-Members (June 8 – June 26) $ 45.00
Onsite/Late Registration (after June 26) $ 50.00

To register: http://www.apalaweb.org/resources/registration/

If you need to renew your APALA membership, go to http://www.apalaweb.org/membership/join-or-renew/

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