Early-Bird Pricing Ends Today for APALA Social Events!

Dear APALA members and friends,

Act now before APALA’s ALA Annual social events before early-bird pricing ends and register now!

Sign up form for both events: www.apalaweb.org/registration

 

Friday, June 28, 2013 (12PM–3PM)

Cambodian American Heritage Museum and Killing Fields Memorial (Cambodian Association of Illinois)
2831 W Lawrence Ave, Chicago, IL 60625

Enjoy a guided visit through the Cambodian American Heritage Museum and Killing Fields Memorial on Chicago’s North Side. Our visit will include South East Asian finger foods and snacks. The museum staff is excited to host us! Established in 2004, the Killing Fields Memorial is the only memorial of its kind outside of Cambodia. The museum and memorial aim to raise awareness of the Cambodian genocide, and human rights more broadly, and celebrate the renewal of Cambodian community and culture in the United States. A portion of APALA’s tour price will be donated to the museum. Additional donations are welcome.

    • Early-bird registration (on/before June 10):  $20 for APALA members / $25 for non-members.
    • Regular registration (June 11–June 24): $30 for non-members / $35 for non-members.
    • Public transit from the Loop: Brown Line (Kimball-bound) to Francisco stop. Use Google Maps for more specific directions.
    • For those interested in going to the museum together from the official APALA hotel, APALA member Paolo Gujilde will meet at 10:45AM in the lobby of the Westin River North and escort the group via public transit to the museum.

 

Saturday, June 29, 2013 (Begins 7PM)

APALA’s Annual 2013 Dinner
Home of Mary Anne Mohanraj

An intimate affair at the Oak Park home of writer Mary Anne Mohanraj: Enjoy a catered and home cooked buffet-style dinner of traditional Sri Lankan dishes (including vegetarian/vegan options) while mingling with friends old and new. Dr. Mohanraj is Professor of Fiction and Literature and Associate Director of Asian and Asian American Studies at the University of Illinois-Chicago. She has authored nine titles, including Bodies in Motion, and is also a translator, Asian American arts organizer, and Executive Director of DesiLit.org. Dr. Mohanraj will be cooking part of the meal and will read pieces from her writings.

    • Early-bird price (before June 10, 2013): $30 for APALA members / $40 for non-members.
    • Regular price (after June 10, 2013): $35 for APALA members / $45 for non-members.
    • You will receive Mary Anne’s home address in your registration confirmation email.
    • Public transit from the Westin River North: From the Clark/Lake stop, take the Green Line (Harlem-bound) to Harlem Green train stop. Use Google Maps for more specific directions.
    • Public transit from McCormick Place: Best to take free ALA shuttle back to the hotel and catch the Green Line as explained above.
    • Cab ride from downtown to Oak Park would be around $25.
    • For those interested in going to Mary Anne’s home together, APALA member Paolo Gujilde will meet at 6PM in the lobby of the Westin River North and escort the group via public transit to her home.

 

Sign up here for both events: www.apalaweb.org/registration  

Please share with your friends, colleagues, and other people who might be interested.

Register early and take advantage of the early-bird registration option. Early registration will help us tremendously with ordering food. Thank you!

Questions? Contact Samanthi Hewakapuge, samanthi@uic.edu.


Download PDF flyer of APALA events at ALA13:


 

APALA Social Events at ALA Annual 2013

Dear APALA members and friends,

Please make plans to attend one or both of APALA’s social events at Annual 2013! We’re pleased to announce that online registration is now open!

Friday, June 28, 2013
Cambodian American Heritage Museum and Killing Fields Memorial – Cambodian Association of Illinois
2831 W Lawrence Ave, Chicago, IL 60625
12PM–3PM – Enjoy a guided visit through the Cambodian American Heritage Museum and Killing Fields Memorial on Chicago’s North Side. Our visit will include South East Asian finger foods and snacks. The museum staff is excited to host us! Established in 2004, the Killing Fields Memorial is the only memorial of its kind outside of Cambodia. The museum and memorial aim to raise awareness of the Cambodian genocide, and human rights more broadly, and celebrate the renewal of Cambodian community and culture in the United States. A portion of APALA’s tour price will be donated to the museum. Additional donations are welcome.

  • Early-bird registration (on/before June 10):  $20 for APALA members / $25 for non-members.
  • Regular registration (June 11–June 24): $30 for non-members / $35 for non-members.
  • Public transit from the Loop: Brown Line (Kimball-bound) to Francisco stop. Use Google Maps for more specific directions.
  • For those interested in going to the museum together from the official APALA hotel, APALA member Paolo Gujilde will meet at 10:45AM in the lobby of the Westin River North and escort the group via public transit to the museum.

Saturday, June 29, 2013
Begins 7PM – APALA’s Annual 2013 dinner will be an intimate affair at the Oak Park home of writer Mary Anne Mohanraj. Enjoy a catered and home cooked buffet-style dinner of traditional Sri Lankan dishes (including vegetarian/vegan options) while mingling with friends old and new. Dr. Mohanraj is Professor of Fiction and Literature and Associate Director of Asian and Asian American Studies at the University of Illinois-Chicago. She has authored nine titles, including Bodies in Motion, and is also a translator, Asian American arts organizer, and Executive Director of DesiLit.org. Dr. Mohanraj will be cooking part of the meal and will read pieces from her writings.

  • Early-bird price (before June 10, 2013): $30 for APALA members / $40 for non-members.
  • Regular price (after June 10, 2013): $35 for APALA members / $45 for non-members.
  • You will receive Mary Anne’s home address in your registration confirmation email.
  • Public transit from the Westin River North: From the Clark/Lake stop, take the Green Line (Harlem-bound) to Harlem Green train stop. Use Google Maps for more specific directions.
  • Public transit from McCormick Place: Best to take free ALA shuttle back to the hotel and catch the Green Line as explained above.
  • Cab ride from downtown to Oak Park would be around $25.
  • For those interested in going to Mary Anne’s home together, APALA member Paolo Gujilde will meet at 6PM in the lobby of the Westin River North and escort the group via public transit to her home.

Sign up here for both events: www.apalaweb.org/registration  

Please share with your friends, colleagues, and other people who might be interested.
Register early and take advantage of the early-bird registration option. Early registration will help us tremendously with ordering food. Thank you!

Questions? Contact Samanthi Hewakapuge, samanthi@uic.edu.


Download PDF flyer of APALA events at ALA13:


 

APALA Events at ALA Midwinter 2013 [UPDATED]

Updated: January 4, 2013

Join APALA colleagues and friends this January for our three Midwinter events in Seattle. Registration information is below.

 

APALA Field Trip to the Wing Luke Museum
Friday, January 25, 2013

11AM – 2PM 

Enjoy a private guided tour of the Smithsonian-affiliated Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience in its historic Chinatown building, a former hotel, where the museum has been housed since 2008. Our 1½ hour-long tour will be followed by a casual group lunch (pay-your-own) at nearby Henry’s Taiwan Plus.

Prices

    • $10 for APALA members/$20 for non-members on or before January 1, 2013.
    • $15 for APALA members/$25 for non-members between January 2, 2013 and January 20, 2013.

Sign up now!

 

Executive Board Meeting (APALA) — Open Meeting
Friday, January 25, 2013 
7:30PM — 9:30PM

Location: Grand Hyatt Seattle (Room: Leonesa I)

Open meeting: No registration required.

 

APALA Dinner with Special Guest David H.W. Wong
Saturday, January 26, 2013

7 PM – 9PM 

APALA’s Midwinter 2013 dinner will be at Thoa’s in downtown Seattle near the Seattle Art Museum and will feature special guest David H.T. Wong, APA activist, architect, and author of Escape to Gold Mountain: A Graphic History of the Chinese in North America. Enjoy a banquet-style Vietnamese dinner (vegetarian option available). Also, Thoa’s has graciously offered to extend their happy hour for us to 7PM that evening, so feel free to show up early and mingle in the tiki bar!

Prices

    • $25 for APALA members/$35 for non-members before January 1, 2013.
    • $30 for APALA members/$40 for non-members between January 1, 2013 and January 20, 2013.

Sign up now!

Questions? Email Becka Kennedy, Chair, Taskforce for Midwinter 2013 Local Arrangements

Visit to Museum of Chinese in America

Please join the New England Chapter of the Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA) on an educational visit to the Museum of Chinese in America in New York City. We have arranged for an hour-long tour of gallery highlights and an introduction to the comics and graphic novels exhibit on Wednesday, October 31st at 3:00 PM. The cost is $6.00 per person. Optional dinner to follow tour!

If you’re interested, please RSVP me at miriamtuliao@nypl.org or 212-930-0734 by October 19. Please invite your colleagues to join this fun event!

Thank you very much!

Sincerely,

Miriam Tuliao
Assistant Director, Branch Collection Development

New York Public Library

The Symposium on Diversity in LIS Education

FREE & Open to the Public
November 8th & 9th, 2012

Symposium on Diversity in LIS Education will bring together information professionals and faculties to focus on preparing all LIS students to be ready to design & deliver inclusive services to diverse populations in the Information Age.

Talks and panels include: Changing demographics of library patrons; Designing academic programs for cultural competency; Recruiting diverse student populations to MLS programs; Funding diversity-related academic programs.

Speakers include:

  • Herman Totten (VP, University and Community Affairs of the University of Northern Texas)
  • Jill Lewis (Director, Maryland Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped)
  • Sandra Hughes-Hassell (Professor, University of North Carolina) presenting the Anne Scott MacLeod Lecture in Children’s Literature

Please go to the Symposium website for more information.

Local and Community History the Focus of APALA Program

By Frederick J. Augustyn, Jr.
The Library of Congress

A program co-sponsored by APALA and the Librarians of Color on Sunday, June 24 titled “So You Think You Can Write: Librarians and Friends Gather and Preserve Our Community History” featuring five books produced under the auspices of Arcadia Publishing’s Images of America series attested to the use that diligent librarians and historians can make of personal and institutional, especially pictorial, records. Florante Peter Ibanez, Manager of Library Computer Services, Loyola Law School, Los Angeles who co-authored with his wife Roselyn Estepa Ibanez Filipinos in Carson and the South Bay (2009) made the general introduction to Asian-American ethnic enclaves. He noted that there are many artifacts of history, not all in print or already on film. A challenge to historians is to record what exists in oral tradition and in other non-tangible forms, such as dance.

Jenny Cho, Chair of the Oral History Program, Chinese Historical Society ofSouthern California, spoke of capturing the memories of those aged 75 and older in her book Chinatown in Los Angeles (2009.) Chinese immigrants have been in America at least since 1850, which coincidentally is when Los Angeles was founded. She noted the 1871 Chinese Massacre in the city, the worst anti-Asian event ever in the U.S. History is ever present with us as was indicated by the bill of apology for the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act issued within the past week.

Lessa Kanani’opua Pelayo-Lozada, Palos Verdes Library, one of the authors of Hawaiians in Los Angeles (2012), said that the photos that she used in her presentation were largely from her family in order to safeguard others’ privacy. Her grandparents and her wish to write her library school thesis on this topic were inspirations for her work on the perpetuation of Hawaiian identity in a new “’aina” (land) outside the home islands. Among the things revealed in her project was that many left what others regard as paradise for educational advancement, for economic reasons, and to pursue mi l itary careers. Pelayo-Lozada listed challenges such as: “community politics” – disagreements among those who supported statehood and those for ethnic sovereignty; time constraints, especially those on “Hawaiian time;” and people reluctant to share personal photos. She admitted that this is “not a definitive history, but a snapshot.” Elnora Kelly Tayag, John Spoor Broome Library, California State University Channel Islands, shared methods that proved effective in producing her book Filipinos in Ventura County (2011). She surveyed local collections although most pictures came from personal rather than corporate collections; engaged in much cold calling because not everyone uses email; attended weekly and monthly meetings of many ethnic organizations to advertize her project and to build trust; and applied for (and fortunately received) a few grants.

Bill Watanabe, founding Executive Director, Little Tokyo Service Center, recounted the themes from the book Los Angeles’s Little Tokyo (2010). Among them were: enterprise, tradition, World War II, sports, and creativity. Many do not know that basketball is very popular with Japanese-Americans in southern California both as a spectator and a participatory sport. Another little-known fact is that the world-wide Pentecostal movement began on Azusa Street in Little Tokyo in 1906.

From ALA Cognotes Annual Conference Highlights (2012)

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