The 2014 Minnesota Institute for Early Career Librarians: Leadership, Organizational Culture, and Emotional Intelligence

by Jennifer Garrett, Michael Qiu and Jungwon Yang

image of the 2014 MIECL cohort

2014 Minnesota Institute for Early Career Librarians Cohort
Photo Credit: University of Minnesota Libraries

The Minnesota Institute for Early Career Librarians (MIECL) is an intensive, one-week professional development program intended for librarians from underrepresented groups in the first three years of their professional careers. Several APALA members attended the 2014 Institute last July and offered to share some of their takeaways in a series of web articles. This is the second installment in which Jennifer Garrett (North Carolina State University), Michael Qiu (University of Southern California), and Jungwon Yang (University of Michigan) discuss leadership, emotional intelligence, and organizational culture.

 For part one in the series, please visit:
http://www.apalaweb.org/the-2014-mn-institute-for-early-career-librarian-a-cohort-of-support

We heard that Emotional Intelligence (EI) was one of main themes of the MIECL program. Does the knowledge of EI change your understanding of leadership and self-awareness? How do you apply EI in your workplace?

Jennifer Garrett (JG): As a new professional, applying the lens of Emotional Intelligence in how I understand myself, in addition to how I monitor the emotions of others, has made me a better leader and colleague. EI has become part of my toolbox and has truly changed how I interact with others in the workplace. An overarching focus of MIECL was to introduce tools and theories to help us better understand ourselves. Being knowledgeable of EI has made me more cognizant of my own emotions and how I label and discriminate between these emotions to others and myself. This is definitely difficult! However, I believe recognizing the difficulty involved in perceiving, reasoning, and managing emotions is a key component to being an effective leader.

Michael Qiu (MQ): As we learned about Emotional Intelligence, I developed a better understanding of the struggle individuals in leadership positions face with people from different backgrounds and experiences. We can all remember those leaders that we thought did a “good job” versus the ones that “struggled or did poorly.” I have a better appreciation for all of the struggles and issues they may have encountered trying to work with so many different individuals. After learning about EI, I now understand that leadership is not a task to be taken lightly and it can involve a balancing act of different emotions and people at any one time. The best leaders are able to take everyone’s strengths and best utilize those strengths for the advancement of the group, project, or unit. As an early career librarian, at my first professional position, learning the lay of the land and how my institution works is a challenge. Applying the concept of EI has allowed me to adapt to different situations more easily and better understand the individuals I am working with.

 Recognizing the difficulty involved in perceiving, reasoning, and managing emotions is a key component to being an effective leader.

Jungwon Yang (JY): Before I attended the MIECL, I thought that leaders were people who had great willingness and vast knowledge to accomplish new ideas. But, this program showed me that performing emotional intelligence, in fact, was a pivotal element to be a good leader. In particular, it was a great discovery to me that social awareness — that is, understanding organizational culture and having empathy toward my colleagues’ feelings — was helpful for succeeding in my work performance as well as in group performance. Since I am working at a large-sized academic library, I often have a chance to work with colleagues from different units, which have different unit cultures. After the program, I found out that thinking about other people’s feelings and their own cultures made it a lot easier to work with them than before.

What were some of the major themes that emerged in your discussion of organizational culture and how have you integrated what you learned into your workplace practice?

JG: The discussion of organizational culture at MIECL was one of the most eye-opening of the week. In being asked to describe our organization’s culture to one another, this really helped make me more mindful of the uniqueness of my institution, while also appreciating the similarities that exist across organizations. Additionally, DeEtta used the iceberg metaphor to help us understand that the values and beliefs that make up the bulk of organizational culture, are often not visible from the surface. One of the main themes that emerged during this activity, is that we only learn to navigate these deeply held assumptions, over time. Following this discussion, I began to realize that I was largely navigating my organization’s unspoken characteristics without being as mindful of them as I should. Once I returned to work, I began drafting my personal and professional learning goals. Being able to place these goals in line with the seen and unseen culture of my organization has made me more successful.

MQ: I believe two major themes emerged in this discussion. The first is even though we think we are all different and unique, there are common, underlying issues that are present in every organization. So if organization x thinks they are the one and only going through a problem, I bet that there are at least another dozen organizations with the same problem. Whenever I have a problem, I know there are others I can consult and lean on who have been through the same situation. The second theme is that understanding organizational culture is important for understanding the implications when taking on new projects, roles, and/or positions. As we have new projects come up in the library, knowing the organizational culture has allowed me to step up and take charge of these projects. These new responsibilities help shape my career and prepare me for the future.

JY: As new librarians, we sometimes struggle with getting respect from our colleagues about our own ideas. During the discussion, we talked about how to resolve the problem in our organization. A useful lesson was that we needed to understand our own organizational cultures to communicate with our colleagues effectively. More importantly, even if our idea was not taken seriously by people right now, we learned that we did not need to be frustrated. Organizational culture is not static. It changes over time. So, our ideas can be adopted in the future when the issue emerges in a different way. As Pasteur said, “chance favors only the prepared mind.”

 

Editing assistance provided by Molly Higgins and Manlia Xiong.

Renewal Through Community Affinity by Cynthia Mari Orozco

by Cynthia Mari Orozco

This third essay continues APALA’s advocacy fatigue mini-series. Written by APALA member Cynthia Mari Orozco, who is also the 2015 APALA-sponsored ALA Emerging Leader, this reflective piece is about seeking inspiration and support beyond the library world. Librarianship, as a helping profession, exacts high emotional costs. Because of this, renewal is a crucial aspect of self-care and, therefore, professional development. Library advocacy is one area in which we can strongly see the professional and the personal working and developing each other.

In anticipation of APALA’s 35th Anniversary & Symposium,  we take a closer look at the very human aspect of advocacy work—fatigue. 

~ Melissa I. Cardenas-Dow, APALA Web Content Sub-committee Chair, 2012-Present

 

Cynthia Mari OrozcoPhil Yu, a.k.a. Angry Asian Man, says it best: “Stay angry.” For me as a librarian, this translates as “Stay angry… at inequity in access to information, surveillance in ebooks or censorship.” In relation to library and information activism, this could extend to “Stay passionate… about user-centered services, diverse books and open access.” These examples barely scratch the surface of the many issues for which librarians advocate or combat against.

But being angry, or passionate, requires an incredible amount of effort, time, and strength. It can be extremely taxing to sustain one’s energy. While we still care, a number of factors can beat down on us and cause us fatigue. Maybe an innovative library program you propose isn’t supported by your colleagues or administration. Maybe you hear a colleague oppose the idea of user-centered services. In my professional life, I have come to rely on a number of networks to sustain and invigorate my passion and energy, both in non-library circles and within the greater library community.

Storytime with Traci Kato-Kiriyama at a Tuesday Night Cafe session. July 15, 2014. Photo credit: Cynthia Mari Orozco

Storytime with TNP founder Traci Kato-Kiriyama at a Tuesday Night Cafe session. July 15, 2014. Photo credit: Cynthia Mari Orozco

Shortly after I started working at my current institution, I also became involved with a local group called Tuesday Night Project (TNP), which describes itself as “an Asian American grassroots and volunteer-based organization fiercely devoted to bridging communities by providing programming and interactive spaces for people to connect through artistic expression and strong, creative, community partnerships.” Its main program is Tuesday Night Cafe, which hosts a free, twice a month (April through October) curated program of multidisciplinary visual and performing art, as well as an open mic. I’m usually tired at the end of my work day, but on these particular Tuesdays, I make an effort to go up to Little Tokyo in Los Angeles and dedicate some of my time to this incredible space. Despite often coming into the space tired, preoccupied with projects I’m working on, and maybe sometimes a little demoralized, I’m instantly reenergized by the passion and love that emanate from this space. I surround myself with artists and art lovers, community organizers, educators, students, friends, and everything, everyone, in-between. I talk to people from a wide range of backgrounds, about what they’re doing in their lives, and I become inspired by  amazing people, projects and collaborations. I also have the opportunity to talk about my library ideas without resistance. My ideas are not met with discouraging  comments like, “It won’t work,” or “There’s no money for that” or any other obstacles. Instead, I consistently get positive energy and genuine “That’s incredible!” or “You got this!” For me, the Tuesday Night Cafe space provides an additional forum outside of my institution to ask faculty and students from other universities about their insights on library services. This brings me non-libraryland perspectives into conversations, which can be extremely valuable.

TNPEveryone needs a cheerleader. Surround yourself with positivity and people devoted to making incredible things happen, even if they’re not in libraries. Through my experience with TNP, I’ve gained emotional sustenance, perspective, and friends. Determine what communities, spaces, and individuals complement your professional and personal self to support you now and into the next phase of your life. Ideas and innovation flourish with support. Break out and build a network of support that works for you.

 

Editing assistance provided by Jaena Rae Cabrera and Melissa Cardenas-Dow.

35 Never Looked So Good: APALA Celebrates Anniversary with Symposium

(San Francisco, CA) In celebration of its 35th anniversary, the Asian Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA) will hold a one-day symposium entitled “Building Bridges: Connecting Communities through Librarianship & Advocacy” at the University of San Francisco’s McLaren Conference Center on Thursday, June 25th, 2015.

“We are celebrating and commemorating this milestone in a city that has a deep history and strong presence of Asian Pacific Islanders,” said Gary Colmenar, one of the co-chairs of the APALA 35th Planning Committee. “We are holding this symposium to reflect the work APALA has done in the past and continues to do so. The theme for the symposium reflects what we have been doing to accomplish the organization’s mission. We serve as a bridge between library, archives and museum professionals with the APA communities.” The APALA Symposium will be held right before the American Library Association (ALA) Annual Conference and Exhibition, June 26-30, at the Moscone Center in San Francisco. Additional programs and cultural events are slated during the ALA Annual Conference, June 26-30.

The keynote speaker is Valarie Kaur, an award-winning documentary filmmaker, civil rights lawyer, and interfaith leader who centers her work on storytelling for social change. She has led campaigns on hate crimes, racial profiling, immigration detention, marriage equality, solitary confinement, and the open Internet. Valarie Kaur believes “the way we make change is just as important as the change we make.” She currently serves as Media and Strategy Fellow at Stanford Law School.

Founded in 1980 by librarians of diverse Asian and Pacific ancestries, APALA has long been committed to supporting and providing greater visibility for Asian / Pacific American (APA) professionals in the areas of libraries, archives, and museums (LAMs) and advancing services to APA communities.

Early bird registration starts January 27, 2015 and ends April 3, 2015

For more information, updates, and registration, visit http://apala35th.apalaweb.org/

Event Details:

Who:                Asian Pacific American Librarians’ Association (APALA)

What:               35th Anniversary Symposium entitled “Building Bridges: Connecting

Communities through Librarianship & Advocacy”      

When:              Thursday, June 25th, 2015, 8:00 A.M. to 7:30 P.M.

Where:                        University of San Francisco’s McLaren Conference; Registration

required

Attached:                   Keynote speaker Valarie Kaur – biography

Valarie Kaur

Valarie KaurValarie Kaur is a civil rights lawyer, documentary filmmaker, and faith-rooted organizer who helps communities tell their stories and organize for social change. She has made award-winning films and led multimedia campaigns on a wide range of issues: hate crimes against Sikh and Muslim Americans, racial profiling, gun violence, marriage equality, immigration detention, and solitary confinement. Valarie is a regular television commentator on MSNBC and opinion contributor toCNN, NPR, PBS, The Washington Post, The Huffington Post, and The New York Times. She has reported on the military commissions at Guantanamo and clerked on the Senate Judiciary Committee. Valarie founded Groundswell Movement of 100,000 members, the nation’s largest multi-faith online organizing community known for “dynamically strengthening faith-based organizing in the 21st century.”

A Senior Fellow at Auburn Seminary, she serves as a national Sikh voice who teaches on movement-building for students, organizers, and interfaith groups. She also works with the U.S. State Department to bring these tools to activists around the world, most recently traveling and teaching throughout Myanmar. She earned degrees at Stanford University, Harvard Divinity School, and Yale Law School, where she founded the Yale Visual Law Project to train future lawyers to make films for social and policy change. She is currently the Media and Strategy Fellow at Stanford Law School, where she helps build the movement to keep the Internet free and open, especially for under-served communities.

The Center for American Progress lists Valarie among 13 national progressive faith leaders to watch. She has been called “a standout figure in the world of interfaith organizing and activism and one of eight Asian American “Women of Influence.” A prolific public speaker on college and university campuses, she was also the youngest to deliver the Baccalaureate Commencement Address at Stanford University.

Valarie lives with her husband and filmmaking partner Sharat Raju and their baby boy Kavi Singh in Los Angeles. She believes that “the way we make change is just as important as the change we make.”

For more information on Valarie, visit her website at http://valariekaur.com/. You can also follow her on Twitter at @valariekaur.

Attached: APALA35th Press Release [pdf]

2014 Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature Winners Selected

CHICAGO – The Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA), an affiliate of the American Library Association, has selected the winners of the 2014 Asian/Pacific American Awards for Literature (APAAL). The awards promote Asian/Pacific American culture and heritage and are awarded to titles published from October 2013 to September 2014 based on their literary and artistic merit.

The Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA) was founded in 1980 by librarians of diverse Asian/Pacific ancestries committed to working together toward a common goal: to create an organization that would address the needs of Asian/Pacific American librarians and those who serve Asian/Pacific American communities.

There are five categories for the Awards, each with a Winner and an Honor book.

Here are the winners of the 2014 awards:

Adult Fiction
• Winner: Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng (Penguin Books)
• Honor: The Sleepwalker’s Guide to Dancing by Mira Jacob (Random House)

Adult Non-Fiction
• Winner: Dubious Gastronomy: The Cultural Politics of Eating Asian in the USA by Robert Ji-Song Ku (University of Hawaii Press)
• Honor: Big Little Man: In Search of My Asian Self written by Alex Tizon (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

Young Adult
• Winner: Tiger Girl by May-Lee Chai (GemmaMedia)
• Honor: Shadow Hero by Gene Luen Yang (First Second), illustration by Sonny Liew.

Children’s
• Winner: Gaijin: American Prisoner of War by Matt Faulkner (Disney/Hyperion Books)
• Honor: Ting Ting by Kristie Hammond (Sono Nis Press, Canada)

Picture Book
• Winner: Hana Hashimoto, Sixth Violin by Chieri Uegaki and Qin Leng (Kids Can Press)
• Honor: Father’s Chinese Opera by Rich Lo (Sky Pony Press)

The winners will each receive an award plaque and an award seal on their book at the APALA Award Ceremony on Saturday, June 27, 2015 during the ALA Annual Conference in San Francisco, CA.

Publishers interested in submitting books for the 2016 awards should contact Dora Ho, Jury Co-Chair, at dorah2005@gmail.com

But Am I Really an Activist? Dealing with Impostor Syndrome by Annie Pho

by Annie Pho

APALA is an organization invested in librarians and library workers as people. A significant part of librarianship is advocacy, whether it is on behalf of our organizations, our fellow library workers, or the communities we serve through our libraries and other civic organizations. In anticipation of APALA’s 35th Anniversary & Symposium,  we take a closer look at the very human aspect of advocacy work–fatigue. 

This second essay in APALA’s advocacy fatigue mini-series, written by APALA member Annie Pho, is about impostor syndrome. She writes about how impostor syndrome relates to librarianship, advocacy and activism.  

~ Melissa I. Cardenas-Dow, APALA Web Content Sub-committee Chair, 2012-Present

 

Annie Pho, 2014When I was first asked to write an article about being an activist librarian, I was really surprised that someone asked me to write about activism in libraries at all. I have never called myself an activist. To me, activists are very organized, well-spoken (and outspoken), proactive in spreading the messages of their cause, and inspire others to be better. While I do care about social justice, I often find myself struggling with the right response to those who critique social justice movements. I consider myself someone who is constantly trying to learn how to be a better citizen, not necessarily someone who inspires others. That’s when I realized the depths of impostor syndrome—always feeling like you are impersonating the role that you currently fulfill. Impostor syndrome is an issue in our profession, and something that permeates many spaces in librarianship.

What is Impostor Syndrome?

Impostor syndrome was first coined by Pauline Rose Clance and Suzanne Imes, who studied the feelings of inadequacy of high achieving women. While women are not the only ones who suffer from this syndrome, it’s not surprising that librarians (a profession that is predominantly female) battle this syndrome. The Geek Feminist Wiki defines impostor syndrome as “a situation where someone feels like an impostor or fraud because they think that their accomplishments are nowhere near as good as those of the people around them.” The negative effects of impostor syndrome can include “generalized anxiety, lack of self confidence, depression, and frustration related to inability to meet self-imposed standards of achievement” (Clance & Imes, 1978). Feeling these effects over a long period of time is exhausting and leads to burnout.

So what does it mean to be an impostor activist? Or more importantly, what does it mean to be an activist? The word activist suggests a sense of authority or knowledge, the ability to organize, and have the right response to naysayers. I constantly feel like I am not doing enough, especially in comparison to those whom I consider to be great activists, those who seem to have a lot of impact in their communities. There’s no way I could do the same. However, thinking like this has a negative impact on your self-esteem and can really hinder your own ability to be the person you want to be. People often express the sentiment that it’s hard to even try to advocate for any social cause because in the end, it doesn’t matter. That change is too hard to create and it’s easier to ignore it (if you have the privilege to do so). It’s extremely difficult to measure any impact that an individual can make on larger societal issues. It’s not always something tangible that you can see. As a result, I think this also adds to the impostor syndrome in seeing yourself as an activist.

Getting Over Impostor Syndrome

It wasn’t until a friend (and someone I look up to as an activist) told me that activism means different things to different people. It was then that I began to understand that there is no one way to be an activist. You can contribute to the cause in many different ways. Organizations might need people to do data entry, or to write, or to design graphics. It’s important for me to remember that even doing a little thing is better than not doing anything at all.

There are a few tactics that you can use to combat impostor syndrome. A recent study published in College & Research Libraries looked at impostor syndrome among librarians and recommended that those who have these feelings should distinguish between feeling incompetent and actually lacking the skills needed to do the job. This is an important distinction, figuring out what is just how you feel versus what you are actually capable of. Asking for feedback and communicating with peers can also help quell these feelings. I participate and sometimes moderate the #critlib Twitter chats, which helps me connect with other librarians who have an interest in critical librarianship. Talking to the #critlib community gives me plenty of things to think about and keeps me connected to the activist librarian community.

I’m not sure if you can ever truly get rid of impostor syndrome, but I think it’s something that you work on over time as you build upon your experiences (and your self-confidence hopefully). For me, building community helps me realize I am not alone and that we are all continually trying to learn and improve ourselves as activists. All we can do is try to be better and do good for the world.

 

Further Reading

Perceived Inadequacy: A Study of the Imposter Phenomenon among College and Research Librarians by Melanie Clark, Kimberly Vardeman, and Shelley Barba

Low Self-Esteem and the Academic Librarian. Maybe it is just me. It is probably just me. by Erin Miller

The Imposter Phenomenon in High Achieving Women: Dynamics and Therapeutic Intervention by Pauline Rose Clance and Suzanne Imes

 

Editing assistance provided by Jaena Rae Cabrera and Melissa Cardenas-Dow.

APALA Midwinter Events [UPDATED]

APALA Midwinter 2015 Events

Reminder: Early bird registration ends Thursday, January 29th.

Please find a list of our events and activities for the 2015 ALA Midwinter Conference. Registration for a visit to the Chinese-American Museum & the Chinatown Chicago Public Library on Friday and for the APALA 35th Anniversary Fundraising Dinner on Saturday is now live at http://www.apalaweb.org/resources/registration/.

 

Friday, January 30th
11:30 – 3:30 p.m. - The Chinese-American Museum & The Chinatown Chicago Public Library

Early Bird Registration: (before event) $15.00

Registration at event: $20.00

Gathering place: Networking Uncommons at McCormick Place, 11:30 a.m.

The Chinese-American Museum: 238 West 23rd Street, Chicago, IL 60616
The Chinatown Chicago Public Library: 2353 South Wentworth Avenue, Chicago, IL 60616

Tentative Schedule:
11:30am – 12:45 p.m. — Take bus to Chinatown and eat lunch
1:00 p.m. — Tour of the Chinese American Museum of Chicago
2:00 p.m. – Tour of Chinatown branch Chicago Public Library

Please join us for a tour of the fabulous Chinese-American Museum of Chicago & the Chinatown Chicago Public Library. For those who want to eat lunch in Chinatown beforehand, we will meet at the Networking Uncommons in the Convention Center on Friday, January 30, 2015 at 11:30 a.m. to take the bus to Chinatown. The tour of the Chinese-American Museum of Chicago begins at 1:00 p.m., followed by the tour of the Chinatown Chicago Public Library Branch. Tour will end around 3:30 p.m.

Register at http://www.apalaweb.org/resources/registration/

7:30 – 9:30 p.m. – APALA Executive Board Meeting, McCormick Place W186-C

Saturday, January 31st

4:30 – 5:30 p.m. – APALA Membership & 35th Anniversary Committees Meeting, McCormick Place W473

6:30 – 10:00 p.m. – APALA 35th Anniversary Fundraising Dinner

Join us for a wonderful and entertaining evening with delicious Asian cuisine and great company! All are invited and encouraged to join APALA in celebrating our APALA 35th Anniversary & Symposium fundraising campaign.

Register at http://www.apalaweb.org/resources/registration/

Lao Sze Chuan
2172 South Archer Avenue, Chicago, IL 60616
(312) 326-5040

http://laoszechuanchinatown-hub.com/

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